Symptoms Of Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome


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Introduction:

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Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) is a sleep disorder that affects many people. It is characterized by difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep at the desired time. As a result, people with DSPS often experience excessive daytime sleepiness and difficulty concentrating. Other common symptoms include feeling grumpy or irritable, headaches, and problems with memory and focus.

There is no one definitive cause of DSPS, but it is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, medications, and lifestyle changes. With the right treatment, most people with DSPS can achieve better sleep and improved quality of life.

Description:

A person lying on a green field

DSPS is a chronic, long-term sleep disorder that affects the timing of when a person sleeps and wakes up. In DSPS, people have trouble falling asleep at night and trouble staying awake during the day. As a result, they may find themselves excessively sleepy during the day or wide awake at night. The official diagnosis of DSPS is based on the following criteria:

Symptoms of sleepiness or insomnia that are present for at least one month. Symptoms cause significant impairment in social, academic, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The symptoms are not caused by any condition that can better explain them (such as another sleep disorder like narcolepsy).

DSPS may be difficult to diagnose because there are several similar conditions. These include advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS), irregular sleep-wake pattern, free-running type, non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome, and shift work sleep disorder.

There is no standard treatment for DSPS. Many people use a combination of medication and behavioral techniques to achieve improved alertness during the day and better sleep at night.

Risk factors for DSPS include:

Shift work or other jobs that involve irregular schedules; A family history of ASPS or circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Other mental health conditions such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, insomnia, and substance abuse issues.

Many individuals with DSPS will resort to napping during the day to get enough rest but this can be very dangerous because when they wake up from their nap they are still tired and may not have time to fall asleep before it is time for them to go back to work or school. So naps must be carefully planned out to not to affect daily life functions that much. Along with taking naps during the day, there are other ways an individual can improve sleeping patterns such as keeping a regular sleep schedule (set times you go to bed every night) even on weekends. Also one should avoid too much stimulation before bedtime especially if it causes anxiety/stress which makes it harder for them to fall asleep.

Conclusion:

Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS) is a chronic and long-term sleep disorder that affects the timing of when an individual sleeps and wakes up because they have trouble falling asleep at night. Many people use a combination of medication and behavioral techniques to achieve improved alertness during the day and better sleep at night. DSPS can cause individuals to be excessively tired during the day making it very hard for them to function properly. Some treatments can be done for an individual to sleep and wake up at better times such as medications, behavioral treatments, or a combination of both.

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